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Noe_ProgrammeSpokesperson
Prof. Dr. Mathias Noe
Program Spokesperson & Topic 6 Spokesperson
+49 721 608-23500
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IJS_Foto
Dr. Isabelle Südmeyer
Manager of Program
+49 721 608-25577
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Urbach
Controlling
+49 721 608-26040
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Barbara Teichert
Assistant
+49 721 608-26010
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Gil_EERA-Coordination
Dr. Myriam Elisa Gil-Bardaji
Manager of JP Energy Storage
+49 721 608-22892
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Dr. Aarti Singh
Coordination EU-Project FASTGRID at KIT
+49 721 608-28015
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Storage and Cross-linked Infrastructures – for the renewable energy age

New Program within the Research Field Energy of the Helmholtz Association

 

On 3rd August 2011, the German Government adopted the 6th Energy Research Program, entitled “Research for an environmentally sound, reliable, and affordable energy supply”. The goals defined in the document provide the foundation for the content and shape of the Helmholtz programs. The programs are in line with the goals outlined in the government’s High-Tech Strategy for Germany and in its Strategy for the Internationalisation of Science and Research.

For present period of program-oriented funding (PoF III) of Helmholtz, which will run from 2015 to 2019, the Research Field Energy will therefore use the findings of its on-going scientific work and the current challenges facing society as a basis for restructuring, refocusing, and further developing its programmes. To better leverage the expertise and potential of Helmholtz research, closer links will be established among all the individual themes, topics, and programs in energy research. This network will also extend beyond the Research Field Energy, thus connecting its work to every other research field within the Helmholtz Association.

Press Release 004/2015

For the success of the German Energiewende, it is mandatory to develop economically efficient energy storage systems and to design and link important infrastructures for energy transmission and distribution. Supply of energy based mostly on renewable energy sources requires three important new technical solutions. First, adequate energy storage to compensate volatile energy generation and to bridge seasonal fluctuations in supply and demand, second, technologies and infrastructures to master the upcoming challenges of energy transmission and distribution, and, third, a much better link between different energy carriers (e.g. gas, electricity) to secure reliable, flexible, efficient, and economic energy supply. These are the guidelines for the following R&D topics in this programme. The main research topics include many technical options and aim for prompt application, eco-friendly manufacturing, high efficiency, and safe and reliable system integration. The programme has important links and contributes to the joint energy storage programme of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA).

 

Participating Helmholtz Centers:

                          

 

 

NEWS

SmILES
August 2017: Energy Transistion: Energy Network Experts bundle Know How

The storage of renewable energies and smart integration of storage into decentralized networks is crucial for a stable energy supply of the future. Coordinated by KIT, the project SmILES brings together expertise in the simulation, optimization and utilization of such infrastructures across Europe. The aim is to build a platform for the exchange of data and best practices for the integration of heterogeneous energy sources and their storage technologies as well as the strengthening of joint European research.

Press Release 114/2017
Hagenmeyer
August 2017: KIT-Expert Prof. Veit Hagenmeyer - Energy Computer Science

The energy system of the future will be more decentralized, and its share of renewable energies will have to deal with wind and weather fluctuations. In view of these challenges, the professor of energy computer science is looking for a stable, economical and secure energy supply according to information and communication technology solutions.

Further Information
 
P2L
July 2017: Power-to-Liquid: 200 Liters of Fuel from Solar Power and the Air’s Carbon Dioxide

Production of liquid fuels from regenerative electric power is a major component of the energy turnaround. The first 200 l of synthetic fuel have now been produced from solar energy and the air’s carbon dioxide by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under the SOLETAIR project. Here, INERATEC, a spinoff of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), cooperates with Finnish partners. The mobile chemical pilot plant that can be used decentrally produces gasoline, diesel, and kerosene from regenerative hydrogen and carbon dioxide. It is so compact that it fits into a shipping container.

Press Release 103/2017
Molecule
July 2017: Natural Molecule to Boost the Performance of Electrodes for Rechargeable Batteries

Chlorophyll, blood, and vitamin B12 are all based on the porphyrin molecule. But porphyrin can also be used as an electrode material where it speeds up the charging process of rechargeable batteries. In the “Angewandte Chemie International Edition” journal, researchers from KIT now present the new material system that could mark the beginning of an era of high-performance energy storage and supercapacitors. 

Press Release 097/2017
 
SPP2080
July 2017: New DFG priority program

The DFG establishes the priority program “Catalysts and Reactors under Dynamic Operation Conditions for Energy Storage and Conversion” (SPP 2080). Coordinator of the SPP 2080 is Prof. Dr. Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt. Project outlines can still be submitted until the 10th of September 2017, the deadline for full proposals is the 8th of January 2018.

OME
July 2017: Research article about Oxymethylene Dimethyl Ethers (OME)

Oxymethylene dimethyl ethers (OMEs) are investigated at IKFT as promising fuel additives that are accessible from renewable resources. A recent computational study from theory and model systems investigated the mechanism for the synthesis of OMEs from trioxane and dimethoxymethane. The results explain the observed experimental selectivity that initially favors OME4 and is eventually controlled thermodynamically. [Goncalves, T. J.; Arnold, U.; Plessow, P. N.; Studt, F. ACS Catalysis 2017, 7, 3615–3621.]